Curated by Josh Rios and Anthony Romero, I’ll make you a movie after I eat was a series of four screenings celebrating Chicana/o moving image works. Each screening was accompanied by a public presentation, performance, or talk in order to provide further context. The screenings took place between October and November 2014 at Gallery 400 (UIC) and Comfort Station. More information regarding the screenings can be found on the Gallery 400 blog. The list of dates, activities, and films can be found below.









University of Illinois schedule 

Monday, October 6, 6pm: 
Yo Soy Chicano (I am Chicano), 59 mins, Jesus Treviño, 1972. Yo Soy Chicano is a KCET produced documentary portrayal of the Chicano/a experience, from its pre-Columbian roots to the Mexican-American struggle for civil rights in the early 1970s.

Chicana, 23 mins, Sylvia Morales, 1979. Chicana traces the history of Chicana and Mexican-origin women from pre-Columbian times to the present. It covers women's roles in Aztec society, their participation in the 1810 struggle for Mexican independence, and their leadership in contemporary civil rights causes.  

After the screening Leonard Ramirez, coauthor of the book Chicanas of 18th Street, joined us for a post-film discussion, which helped to ground the films in the actual experiences and real circumstances that many audience members had first-hand knowledge of.

Monday, October 13, 6pm: 
Chulas Fronteras, 58 mins, Les Blank, 1976. Chulas Fronteras is a complex, insightful look at the Chicano/a experience as mirrored in the lives and music of the most acclaimed Norteño musicians of the Texas-Mexican border, including Flaco Jimenez and Lydia Mendoza.

Previous to the screening Lisa Junkin-Lopez, interim director of the Jane Addams-Hull House Museum, presented on the Hull-House Kilns, an historic project of the Hull-House settlement and an early example of intercultural exchange in Chicago's Mexican community.

Comfort Station schedule

Sunday, October 26, 7pm:
Born in East L.A. (1987) 85 mins. Cheech Marin writes, directs and stars in Born in East L.A., a hip, outrageous comedy based on his best-selling record parody. The story follows Rudy (Marin), an American of Hispanic descent, whose south-of-the-border looks show him no mercy during an immigration raid in a migrant worker factory. As his luck goes, he is caught with neither money nor his ID and is deported to Mexico - without speaking a word of Spanish! Rudy is in for a crazy ride as he tries every legal, and illegal, scheme he can think of to get back home to the States.

Sunday, September 14, 7pm:
Frontierland / Fronterilandia (1995) 77 mins.  Frontierland / Fronterilandia examines multiple points of cultural contact between the United States and Mexico, from South Carolina's kitschy “South of the Border” tourist complex, to a Mexican Beatles cover band. Working at the boundaries of experimental film and documentary travelogue, the film weaves together found footage, interviews, performance art, and music video to produce a masterful commentary revealing the borderlands as a laboratory of hybridity for both nations.  

Preceding the screening of Frontierland / Fronterilandia we performed "Tortilla Manifest," a theatrical reading about Chicana/o potentiality and heating tortillas.